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administration, president obama's administration, charged with this duty is the director of office of management and budget, historically that has been the case. but my concerns go deeper than that. i believe that every public official in this nation owes an absolute loyalty to the united states, to the betterment of this country and its government. and to the institutional processes that lead to the governing of america. there can be no doubt that every government official from the president on down is accountable to the institutions of our government and to the people, ultimately, without doubt the direction of o.m.b., the director of o.m.b. has such a duty. he's required to meet that duty with honor, honesty, efficiency, and responsiveness. he serves us. we don't serve him. he serves the american people. the american people send their money to washington and they expect it will be honestly and openly managed, accountable. they have every right to demand high performance from all officials, but particularly the director of the office of office of management and budget. surely there can be no h
leadership, the faith-based leadership, and, again, a shout out to president obama, his cabinet and the members on both sides of the aisle that stood by this region, the gulf coast, to rebuild after all of these years. and, mr. president, in conclusion, it's my only hope that after passing the sandy supplemental we will stand united with the northeast as they rebuild bigger, better, stronger, hosting the next super bowl, which is a real symbol of resurgence and rebuilding and resurrection. thank you, mr. president. and i yield the floor. mr. harkin: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from iowa. mr. harkin: mr. president, this week is a milestone for working families across america. 20 years ago this week, president bill clinton signed into law the family and medical leave act. you know, there are many laws that we pass here in washington that most americans never have reason to know or care about. the fmla, by contrast, has changed this country in profoundly important ways. it has touched the lives of millions of working families. it's almost hard to imagine today
connection with you. we had the inauguration this week of barack obama, january 19th, 2013. that very month is full of epic anniversaries regarding raise and american history, exactly 150 years ago since the emancipation proclamation by lincoln which is popularized in this story of the 13th amendment two januarys later in 1865 in a spielberg film that is nominated for the academy award. getting a sense of that history. but more pertinent for us, 150 years, 2013, up to get at sense of how tricky this history has been, i want you to think about the 50 year anniversary. fifty years ago this january in january of 1963, i was getting my driver's license. that was a big deal. martin luther king was resolved to go into birmingham this month, he decided and didn't tell his father and didn't tell any of his board members because he knew they would try to stop it and what he said was after eight years since the brown decision, descending the militia defending segregation have mobilized across the segregated states than the forces of freedom and we are about to lose our window in history and if i don'
'm tempted to describe president obama's spending and tax ideas as small ball, but they're worse than that. they represent a conscious decision to neglect some of the most pressing issues that confront our country. you might even say it's a dereliction of duty in the battle to save america. last week, the congressional budget office projected that our gross national debt will increase from $16 trillion in 2012 to $26 trillion in 2023. now, that may seem like a long way off, but just since president obama has been president, the national debt's gone up by 55%, just in the last four years. but if you project that forward to 2023 when some of these young men and women who are working here as pages will be looking at entering the work force and looking at their futures, all they will see ahead of them is debt and a reduced standard of living. this is what lies ahead for all of us unless we embrace real spending cuts and unless we deal with the unfunded liabilities of medicare and social security. now, president obama has a secret strategy for getting our debt under control, we'd all love to he
had inauguration this week. barack obama, january 19, 2013. this very month is full of epic anniversary, regarding race and american history. it's 150 years ago since the emancipation proclamation by lincoln which is now popularized in the story of the 13th amendment just two januaries later in 1865 in the spielberg film nominated for the academy award. we're getting a sense of that history. more pert innocent for us, 150 years, 2013, to get a sense of how tricky this history has been, i want you to think about the 50-year anniversary. fifty years ago this january, in january 1963, i was getting my driver's license. that was a big deal. martin luther king was resolved to go into birmingham. this month, he decided, and he didn't tell his father or tell his board members because he knew they would try to stop him. what he said was, after eight years since the brown decision, the forces defending segregation mobilized across the segregated states than the forces of freedom, and we're about to lose our window in history, and if i don't take the more risk that i have the way thes
's understanding and support for our efforts. in contrast, president obama believes that done carefully, deliberately and responsibly we can be more transparent and still insure our nation's security. finish so let me say it as simply as i can: yes, in full accordance with the law and in order to prevent terrorist attacks on the united states and to save american lives, the united states government conducts targeted strikes against specific al-qaeda terrorists, sometimes using remotely-piloted aircraft often refer today publicly as drones. and i'm here today because president obama has instructed us to be more open with the american people about these efforts. broadly speaking, the debate over strikes targeted at individual members of al-qaeda has centered on their legality, their ethics, the wisdom of using them and the standards by which they are approved. with the remainder of my time today, i would like to address each of these in turn. first, these targeted strikes are legal. attorney general holder, harold coe and jay johnson have all addressed this question at length. to briefly
$10.50, i think president obama suggested $9.50 at one point but nothing was ever done about it, it would take a lot of people off of welfare and put 'em back to work. and that's what we really need. >> host: okay. all right. joyce in bethesda near maryland, republican caller not too far from the capitol, go ahead, joyce. >> caller: good morning. >> host: morning. >> caller: and thank you very much for c-span. i wanted to bring out, first of all, we want them to cut spending, but more importantly than that, we want them to address this issue of drugs in our schools. we met with president obama's drug policy staff on the 23rd of january asking them to do this and telling them that we really held them responsible for, actually, treason against children. if you're, if you are violating a and certainly our children everywhere taking, taking into consideration the children in connecticut who were 20 babies killed, and we all believe that somewhere along the line there's a drug issue involved here. >> host: so, joyce, when it comes to spending cuts, are you saying, yeah, we need to cu
in 2004 and by the way have you changed any of your views since the election of barack obama? >> guest: i remember my mother when he was nominated, hazel and khalia and i were in montrÉal. she called me at the hotel. she was i think 93 then. she said, and she was crying. [inaudible] i didn't need that telling. i always knew this. america is many places. it is a place that can be tolerant and accepting, a place where views can be moderated and differences can be reconciled. and i think a good deal of america supported vigorously the candidacy of a rock obama. and it's not only important to the black community. it's important to other americans as well. but he still faces a sort of vicious kind of ridicule from certain borders that are not unlike the america we saw when i was young in richmond, virginia. but, i think there are several americans -- i had grown tired of at least one of them. >> host: and "quitting america" you wrote america never helps anyone, even the starving and list its proposed to an american interest either strategic or economic and one cannot always distinguish one fr
. obviously we are. there's to many things that happen. even the presence of obama in the white house itself raises racial questions for some people said that while we may be on the way some day to be post-racial, i think it is fair to say that we are not now. >> host: do have a relationship obama? >> guest: not really, no. >> host: "and justice for all," her most recent book, professor at the university of pennsylvania, former chairwoman of the u.s. commission on civil rights. here is a history of the u.s. commission on civil rights. mary frances berry on booktv on c-span 2. >> i'm sure you're more familiar with malcolm knox. at that time, he was always supposedly the man in favor of violence. that wasn't the issue. he did support the right of armed self-defense, but he didn't promote progressive violence. malcolm x said power against power. we are not going to convince the right segregationists to accept. we have to build our own four saves until they have no choice but to recognize their demands and that's power. and he called this black nationalism. he built a whole ideology about it. th
. and this afternoon we are honored to host hillary rodham clinton. during her last 24 hours as president obama's first president obama's first secretary of state and immediately afterwards and told she might be expected to party like it's cartagena all over again. [laughter] we did a research and this is the eighth time that hillary clinton has spoken at the council and her third appearance in and her current incarnation as secretary of state. this afternoon speech is probably the most anticipated one she has given here and indeed it may be the most anticipated farewell address since 1796. [laughter] i suspect though that her views on untangling alliances might be somewhat different than george washington's. much has been made of the mile she has put in as the country's 67 secretary of state. you've seen the using the statistics. she has visited 112 countries and locked -- miles of flight time. more important than that madam secretary is what you have put into these miles and your 10 years coincide with what the most consequential events and decisions of this young century the balancing american for
say it was president obama in his first term, he said: i am here because you all marched. not in america yet 50 years ago what did i think america was? it was all things to me. my husband's home country, my new jewish family -- [inaudible] robin and benjamin, leonard's cousins, and lots of americans. we came here from amsterdam to photograph the black people. i have no photo of myself and our seven month stay in -- [inaudible] leonard was very frugal. he needed all film for his project, "black and white america." nothing but racists, he said. i wish i had a picture of myself and of leonard at the march on washington. i only had my eyes. and these eyes looked and looked and looked. i would say all these places. and when leonard asked me how i liked the day, i would say all these faces, the day of the march was america for me. and then the speech of dr. martin king, ruth -- luther king, "i have a dream." the speech was in the air. it moved like a wave over the heads of all those people. the voice was strong, a preacher's voice. it reached everyone. i had never heard anythin
the daunting challenges imposed by the new federal health care law. i didn't support obama care, but it's the law of the land, the election is over, and the supreme court has ruled. my job is not to play party politics, but to implement this law in a way that best serves new mexico. [applause] that's why last week i announced we will expand medicaid to cover up to 170,000 more low income new mexicans. [applause] it was the right thing to do. it means expanding the health care safety net to more of those in need, moving care from costly emergency rooms into primary it does not jeopardize the budget outlook. in fact, given our unique population and programs we can expect revenue increases that offset the cost of providing these services. but i've been clear, medicaid expansion is a federal government commitment. and if they should ever break their funding promise, new mexico will not pick up the burden of adults most recently added to the program at the cutting health care for new mexico kids. i will not let those kids pay the price. [applause] another way new mexico can level the playing
for an hour and will meet with president obama and the white house tomorrow her last day of secretary. her successors and it should john kerry opie at the state department monday for a welcoming ceremony. [applause] >> please take your seats. good afternoon and on behalf of bob rubin, carla hills who is with us today and the entire board of directors and the members i want to welcome you to the council on foreign relations. i'm richard haas president of the cfr. for those of you who don't know who we are we are an independent nonpartisan membership organization of think-tank and a publisher and we are dedicated to improving the understanding of the world of the foreign policy choices facing this country. today we are continuing what we have come to call secretary of state we cure the council. on tuesday night we were fortunate to hear from george shultz, who served as secretary of state for some six and a half years under president ronald reagan. and this afternoon we are honored to host hillary rodham clinton. during her last 24 hours as president obama's for secretary of state, immediate
with you. we have inauguration this week. barack obama. january 19, 2013. this very month is full of epic anniversaries regarding race in american history. a separate 150 years ago says the emancipation proclamation. by lincoln which is now popularized in the story of the 13th amendment, just to january's later in 1865. nominated for the academy award for giving a sense of that history. more pertinent, 150 years, 2013, to get a sense of how tricky this history has been, i want you to think about the 50-year anniversary. fifty years ago this january, january 1963i was getting my driver's license. that was a big deal. martin luther king was not resolved to go into birmingham this month. he decided, and he did not tell his father, and he did not tell any of his board members because the new try to stop and. what he said was, after eight years since the decision the forces defending segregation had mobilized vociferously across a segregated states than the forces of freedom, and we are about to lose our window in history, and a final take more risk than i have the way the students have been t
with you. we had inauguration this week, barack obama january night teen, 2013. this very month his fault that they cannot bursaries regarding race in america in his tree. it's exactly 150 years ago since the emancipation proclamation by lincoln, which is now popularized in the story of the 13th amendment, to january january 33265 in the spielberg film nominated for the academy award. we are getting a sense of the history. the more pertinent for a, 105th ears, 2013, to get a sense of how tricky this history has been, i want you to think about the 50 year anniversary. 50 years ago this january, in january 1963, i was getting my drivers license. that was a big deal. martin luther king was resolved to go into birmingham this month. he decided and he didn't tell his father and he didn't tell any of its board members because he knew they would try to stop them. what he said was after eight years since the brown decision, the forces defending segregation have mobilized more vociferously across the segregated state and the forces of freedom and we're about to lose her window in history and if i
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)